LARKS WILL BENEFIT FROM OUTREACH

Lynn FullerStreaked Horned Lark Conservation

In the Spring 2017 edition of Oregon Seed Magazine, Niles Brinton outlines his hopes for a threatened bird in the Pacific Northwest. As the Streaked Horned Lark Specialist for Pacific Birds, Niles is working as part of a lark partnership to ultimately recover the lark’s population–estimated to be only 900 to 1300 birds in the Willamette Valley. Niles stresses the importance of learning from each other, and notes the partnership is committed to seeking solutions that work for both larks and farmers.

HAWAII MEETINGS GO ALL-BIRD

Lynn FullerAbout Pacific Birds and Joint Ventures

Pacific Birds has been working to conserve birds in Hawaii for more than a decade, with a focus on conserving endangered waterbirds and their habitats. Quarterly partner meetings, rotating among the main islands, have been a hallmark of the Joint Venture and provide a venue for sharing information about the latest research, conservation strategies and partner projects on the islands.
Starting with the upcoming meeting in June, we are going all-bird and agenda topics include landbirds, seabirds and waterbirds.

SEABIRDS AND ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS DON’T MIX

Lynn FullerPartner Projects, Research

A new paper in Conservation Biology reviews the impacts of artificial lighting to seabirds across the globe, including the Hawaiian Islands. Researchers wanted to identify information gaps and recommend conservation strategies to address an issue that is impacting at least 56 species of seabirds globally–45% of which are listed as vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

PARTNERS CELEBRATE NEW WHSRN SITE

Lynn FullerCoastal Wetlands, Flyways, Partner Projects

Congratulations to all the stakeholders who worked to create a new Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network (WHSRN) site in the Pacific Birds region! Willapa Bay and Long Beach Peninsula is now designated as a WHSRN site of international importance. It is estimated that 200,000-300,000 shorebirds utilize the extensive mudflats and other coastal habitats during migration. And it hosts 10% or more of the world’s populations of Short-billed Dowitcher, Red Knot, and Dunlin subspecies.

NAWCA GRANT CONSERVES A PIECE OF THE PACIFIC FLYWAY

Lynn FullerCoastal Wetlands, Flyways

A piece of the Pacific Americas Flyway will be conserved for migratory birds and other wildlife, thanks to the Lower Nehalem Community Trust (LNCT), Tillamook County and other partners. The Trust recently received a North American Wetlands Conservation Act grant to conserve 33 acres of high-quality intertidal salt marsh and tidal channels at Botts Marsh in Nehalem Bay, Oregon.